REAL ESTATEDAYSORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 17TH 20111YRON’S TOP 52 RECORDS OF 2011 RANKING: #25In order to make an impression as a new band in a market saturated with endless replicas, it often helps if they can successfully merge two or more existing ideas into something new. If that sound reminds an audience of a band or album they’ve previously fallen in love with, then that’s even better. For the New Jersey-formed, Brooklyn-based band Real Estate, their self-titled album was a minor commercial success and major critical triumph that confirmed their ear for melody and simple, breezy surf rock guitars. Two years later and Real Estate had signed with British independent label Domino, responsible for launching the careers of Arctic Monkeys and Franz Ferdinand, and were ready to release their sophomore record, Days. Whether Real Estate will become as much of a household name as the two aforementioned bands remains to be seen, but I think it’s somewhat doubtful. Regardless, for an independent label to boast two such enduring bands with relatively healthy worldwide sales is no bad thing for an independent label. One feels that in light of this, and the more important subject of Days exposing them to an even larger audience, Real Estate have a rather bright future ahead.Days stands apart from Real Estate’s self-titled debut only in the sense that it’s cut from the same cloth. This isn’t a massive departure or an attempt to reinvent the wheel by exploring different genres or unusual vocal treatments. What they have done is take their already wonderful aesthetic and tweak it, making it more expansive and panoramic, both feats you can successfully undertake when your sound already evokes such landscape imagery. I almost want to use the word ‘inoffensive’ to describe Days, yet that seems to do a disservice to just how wonderfully languid and dreamy it can so often be. These guys are aware that the guitar is their primary instrument and it’s the main contributor to their beautiful Sunday morning, walk by the river soundscapes. Kinder Blumen, a wonderful instrumental number, has structure and form within a limited capacity. One feels that vocals may be introduced at some point, yet that moment never arrives; it keeps returning to that initial opening riff. It’s a four minute picture postcard and its addition as a solely instrumental number on a record so decidely focused on instrumentation feels important. Out Of Tune follows, and this time the guitars feel more astute than before, releasing thin slithers that curl in the summer air. That idea of the music curling is quite significant to how Days is approached, or at the very least, subsequently enjoyed. On the expansive seven and a half minute closing track All The Same, an extended mid-section of guitars is protracted to a wonderfully repetitive finale, like waves approaching a shore, or a paper bag falling to the ground in centrical patterns.The latter can also be said for the gorgeous Municipality as circling guitars arch like thick brushstrokes over the verses and mid-sections. Frontman Martin Courtney possess a vocal that rides over these floating melodies while simultaneously containing enough weight to tie the two together in beautiful harmony. Part of the enjoyment that comes from Days is the possibility of surrendering to its charms and feeling safe in the knowledge that it will carry you along for the full length of its duration without dropping you suddenly. Its sound remains very similar throughout and there’s little in the way of deviation from that pre-ordained route. This, then, can make it difficult to note particular standouts. Whilst it’s true that Days can begin to feel a little repetitive in its final stages, it treads a well-worn path of coalescing its more melodic numbers at the start and its meandering, elusive ones at the end. I’ve heard arguments for and against this method of sequencing, since surely it makes sense to pepper your melodic gems over the course of the record as opposed to condensing them all at the front. On Days, however, this isn’t the case. This is a record that you can get lost in over and over again, so when songs like Younger Than Yesterday and Three Blocks find themselves near the end, we’ve already travelled so far and become firmly entrenched in that wonderful trademark guitar tone that feels so omnipresent throughout.Much like in the way Talk Talk’s final two albums encouraged a deeper exploration of their sound on the listener’s part, Days invites us to surrender. Granted, this is a much more straight forward work than either Spirit Of Eden or Laughing Stock, but the idea is the same. Nevertheless, Days' strongest moments and its most enduring remain that opening triptych: Easy is the breeziest slice of indie surf rock of 2011 with lyrics and vocals that encourage lazy summer days spent exploring the suburbs deep within America. It’s now hard to perceive suburban life in rock music in a way that doesn’t attach an angst and feeling of bewilderment since Arcade Fire released The Suburbs a couple of years back, but Real Estate manage to avoid inviting stronger emotions. They touch on that angst only a little with Green Aisles, but even then the memories of days gone by feel completely romantic. The hat trick concludes with It’s Real, a shuffling surf rock pop number that builds irresistible vocals over waves of percussion.Ultimately, Days remains that rare breed of record from an independent band that isn’t battling for your attention by trying to oust the competition or appeal to as wide an audience as possible. It’s likely that it was heard by many who found it boring, saccharin or bland, and that’s just fine. Real Estate have the potential to explore their sound and build upon what’s already here, but for now it’s nice to come across a band that seem so rested and content with where they’re currently at. The cover of Days is a photograph from Dan Graham’s 1965 Homes For America series, bound by the theme of rows and rows of houses. It is a pointed and considered choice that compliments the music perfectly. For their third album, I’d love to see them acquire an image by Baldessari or Ruscha, and make it fit the music similarly. I have no idea what that would sound like, but I’d be very curious to find out.

REAL ESTATE
DAYS

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 17TH 2011
1YRON’S TOP 52 RECORDS OF 2011 RANKING: #25


In order to make an impression as a new band in a market saturated with endless replicas, it often helps if they can successfully merge two or more existing ideas into something new. If that sound reminds an audience of a band or album they’ve previously fallen in love with, then that’s even better. For the New Jersey-formed, Brooklyn-based band Real Estate, their self-titled album was a minor commercial success and major critical triumph that confirmed their ear for melody and simple, breezy surf rock guitars. Two years later and Real Estate had signed with British independent label Domino, responsible for launching the careers of Arctic Monkeys and Franz Ferdinand, and were ready to release their sophomore record, Days. Whether Real Estate will become as much of a household name as the two aforementioned bands remains to be seen, but I think it’s somewhat doubtful. Regardless, for an independent label to boast two such enduring bands with relatively healthy worldwide sales is no bad thing for an independent label. One feels that in light of this, and the more important subject of Days exposing them to an even larger audience, Real Estate have a rather bright future ahead.


Days stands apart from Real Estate’s self-titled debut only in the sense that it’s cut from the same cloth. This isn’t a massive departure or an attempt to reinvent the wheel by exploring different genres or unusual vocal treatments. What they have done is take their already wonderful aesthetic and tweak it, making it more expansive and panoramic, both feats you can successfully undertake when your sound already evokes such landscape imagery. I almost want to use the word ‘inoffensive’ to describe Days, yet that seems to do a disservice to just how wonderfully languid and dreamy it can so often be. These guys are aware that the guitar is their primary instrument and it’s the main contributor to their beautiful Sunday morning, walk by the river soundscapes. Kinder Blumen, a wonderful instrumental number, has structure and form within a limited capacity. One feels that vocals may be introduced at some point, yet that moment never arrives; it keeps returning to that initial opening riff. It’s a four minute picture postcard and its addition as a solely instrumental number on a record so decidely focused on instrumentation feels important. Out Of Tune follows, and this time the guitars feel more astute than before, releasing thin slithers that curl in the summer air. That idea of the music curling is quite significant to how Days is approached, or at the very least, subsequently enjoyed. On the expansive seven and a half minute closing track All The Same, an extended mid-section of guitars is protracted to a wonderfully repetitive finale, like waves approaching a shore, or a paper bag falling to the ground in centrical patterns.


The latter can also be said for the gorgeous Municipality as circling guitars arch like thick brushstrokes over the verses and mid-sections. Frontman Martin Courtney possess a vocal that rides over these floating melodies while simultaneously containing enough weight to tie the two together in beautiful harmony. Part of the enjoyment that comes from Days is the possibility of surrendering to its charms and feeling safe in the knowledge that it will carry you along for the full length of its duration without dropping you suddenly. Its sound remains very similar throughout and there’s little in the way of deviation from that pre-ordained route. This, then, can make it difficult to note particular standouts. Whilst it’s true that Days can begin to feel a little repetitive in its final stages, it treads a well-worn path of coalescing its more melodic numbers at the start and its meandering, elusive ones at the end. I’ve heard arguments for and against this method of sequencing, since surely it makes sense to pepper your melodic gems over the course of the record as opposed to condensing them all at the front. On Days, however, this isn’t the case. This is a record that you can get lost in over and over again, so when songs like Younger Than Yesterday and Three Blocks find themselves near the end, we’ve already travelled so far and become firmly entrenched in that wonderful trademark guitar tone that feels so omnipresent throughout.


Much like in the way Talk Talk’s final two albums encouraged a deeper exploration of their sound on the listener’s part, Days invites us to surrender. Granted, this is a much more straight forward work than either Spirit Of Eden or Laughing Stock, but the idea is the same. Nevertheless, Days' strongest moments and its most enduring remain that opening triptych: Easy is the breeziest slice of indie surf rock of 2011 with lyrics and vocals that encourage lazy summer days spent exploring the suburbs deep within America. It’s now hard to perceive suburban life in rock music in a way that doesn’t attach an angst and feeling of bewilderment since Arcade Fire released The Suburbs a couple of years back, but Real Estate manage to avoid inviting stronger emotions. They touch on that angst only a little with Green Aisles, but even then the memories of days gone by feel completely romantic. The hat trick concludes with It’s Real, a shuffling surf rock pop number that builds irresistible vocals over waves of percussion.


Ultimately, Days remains that rare breed of record from an independent band that isn’t battling for your attention by trying to oust the competition or appeal to as wide an audience as possible. It’s likely that it was heard by many who found it boring, saccharin or bland, and that’s just fine. Real Estate have the potential to explore their sound and build upon what’s already here, but for now it’s nice to come across a band that seem so rested and content with where they’re currently at. The cover of Days is a photograph from Dan Graham’s 1965 Homes For America series, bound by the theme of rows and rows of houses. It is a pointed and considered choice that compliments the music perfectly. For their third album, I’d love to see them acquire an image by Baldessari or Ruscha, and make it fit the music similarly. I have no idea what that would sound like, but I’d be very curious to find out.

REAL ESTATEDAYSORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 17TH 20111YRON’S TOP 52 RECORDS OF 2011 RANKING: #25In order to make an impression as a new band in a market saturated with endless replicas, it often helps if they can successfully merge two or more existing ideas into something new. If that sound reminds an audience of a band or album they’ve previously fallen in love with, then that’s even better. For the New Jersey-formed, Brooklyn-based band Real Estate, their self-titled album was a minor commercial success and major critical triumph that confirmed their ear for melody and simple, breezy surf rock guitars. Two years later and Real Estate had signed with British independent label Domino, responsible for launching the careers of Arctic Monkeys and Franz Ferdinand, and were ready to release their sophomore record, Days. Whether Real Estate will become as much of a household name as the two aforementioned bands remains to be seen, but I think it’s somewhat doubtful. Regardless, for an independent label to boast two such enduring bands with relatively healthy worldwide sales is no bad thing for an independent label. One feels that in light of this, and the more important subject of Days exposing them to an even larger audience, Real Estate have a rather bright future ahead.Days stands apart from Real Estate’s self-titled debut only in the sense that it’s cut from the same cloth. This isn’t a massive departure or an attempt to reinvent the wheel by exploring different genres or unusual vocal treatments. What they have done is take their already wonderful aesthetic and tweak it, making it more expansive and panoramic, both feats you can successfully undertake when your sound already evokes such landscape imagery. I almost want to use the word ‘inoffensive’ to describe Days, yet that seems to do a disservice to just how wonderfully languid and dreamy it can so often be. These guys are aware that the guitar is their primary instrument and it’s the main contributor to their beautiful Sunday morning, walk by the river soundscapes. Kinder Blumen, a wonderful instrumental number, has structure and form within a limited capacity. One feels that vocals may be introduced at some point, yet that moment never arrives; it keeps returning to that initial opening riff. It’s a four minute picture postcard and its addition as a solely instrumental number on a record so decidely focused on instrumentation feels important. Out Of Tune follows, and this time the guitars feel more astute than before, releasing thin slithers that curl in the summer air. That idea of the music curling is quite significant to how Days is approached, or at the very least, subsequently enjoyed. On the expansive seven and a half minute closing track All The Same, an extended mid-section of guitars is protracted to a wonderfully repetitive finale, like waves approaching a shore, or a paper bag falling to the ground in centrical patterns.The latter can also be said for the gorgeous Municipality as circling guitars arch like thick brushstrokes over the verses and mid-sections. Frontman Martin Courtney possess a vocal that rides over these floating melodies while simultaneously containing enough weight to tie the two together in beautiful harmony. Part of the enjoyment that comes from Days is the possibility of surrendering to its charms and feeling safe in the knowledge that it will carry you along for the full length of its duration without dropping you suddenly. Its sound remains very similar throughout and there’s little in the way of deviation from that pre-ordained route. This, then, can make it difficult to note particular standouts. Whilst it’s true that Days can begin to feel a little repetitive in its final stages, it treads a well-worn path of coalescing its more melodic numbers at the start and its meandering, elusive ones at the end. I’ve heard arguments for and against this method of sequencing, since surely it makes sense to pepper your melodic gems over the course of the record as opposed to condensing them all at the front. On Days, however, this isn’t the case. This is a record that you can get lost in over and over again, so when songs like Younger Than Yesterday and Three Blocks find themselves near the end, we’ve already travelled so far and become firmly entrenched in that wonderful trademark guitar tone that feels so omnipresent throughout.Much like in the way Talk Talk’s final two albums encouraged a deeper exploration of their sound on the listener’s part, Days invites us to surrender. Granted, this is a much more straight forward work than either Spirit Of Eden or Laughing Stock, but the idea is the same. Nevertheless, Days' strongest moments and its most enduring remain that opening triptych: Easy is the breeziest slice of indie surf rock of 2011 with lyrics and vocals that encourage lazy summer days spent exploring the suburbs deep within America. It’s now hard to perceive suburban life in rock music in a way that doesn’t attach an angst and feeling of bewilderment since Arcade Fire released The Suburbs a couple of years back, but Real Estate manage to avoid inviting stronger emotions. They touch on that angst only a little with Green Aisles, but even then the memories of days gone by feel completely romantic. The hat trick concludes with It’s Real, a shuffling surf rock pop number that builds irresistible vocals over waves of percussion.Ultimately, Days remains that rare breed of record from an independent band that isn’t battling for your attention by trying to oust the competition or appeal to as wide an audience as possible. It’s likely that it was heard by many who found it boring, saccharin or bland, and that’s just fine. Real Estate have the potential to explore their sound and build upon what’s already here, but for now it’s nice to come across a band that seem so rested and content with where they’re currently at. The cover of Days is a photograph from Dan Graham’s 1965 Homes For America series, bound by the theme of rows and rows of houses. It is a pointed and considered choice that compliments the music perfectly. For their third album, I’d love to see them acquire an image by Baldessari or Ruscha, and make it fit the music similarly. I have no idea what that would sound like, but I’d be very curious to find out.

REAL ESTATE
DAYS

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 17TH 2011
1YRON’S TOP 52 RECORDS OF 2011 RANKING: #25


In order to make an impression as a new band in a market saturated with endless replicas, it often helps if they can successfully merge two or more existing ideas into something new. If that sound reminds an audience of a band or album they’ve previously fallen in love with, then that’s even better. For the New Jersey-formed, Brooklyn-based band Real Estate, their self-titled album was a minor commercial success and major critical triumph that confirmed their ear for melody and simple, breezy surf rock guitars. Two years later and Real Estate had signed with British independent label Domino, responsible for launching the careers of Arctic Monkeys and Franz Ferdinand, and were ready to release their sophomore record, Days. Whether Real Estate will become as much of a household name as the two aforementioned bands remains to be seen, but I think it’s somewhat doubtful. Regardless, for an independent label to boast two such enduring bands with relatively healthy worldwide sales is no bad thing for an independent label. One feels that in light of this, and the more important subject of Days exposing them to an even larger audience, Real Estate have a rather bright future ahead.


Days stands apart from Real Estate’s self-titled debut only in the sense that it’s cut from the same cloth. This isn’t a massive departure or an attempt to reinvent the wheel by exploring different genres or unusual vocal treatments. What they have done is take their already wonderful aesthetic and tweak it, making it more expansive and panoramic, both feats you can successfully undertake when your sound already evokes such landscape imagery. I almost want to use the word ‘inoffensive’ to describe Days, yet that seems to do a disservice to just how wonderfully languid and dreamy it can so often be. These guys are aware that the guitar is their primary instrument and it’s the main contributor to their beautiful Sunday morning, walk by the river soundscapes. Kinder Blumen, a wonderful instrumental number, has structure and form within a limited capacity. One feels that vocals may be introduced at some point, yet that moment never arrives; it keeps returning to that initial opening riff. It’s a four minute picture postcard and its addition as a solely instrumental number on a record so decidely focused on instrumentation feels important. Out Of Tune follows, and this time the guitars feel more astute than before, releasing thin slithers that curl in the summer air. That idea of the music curling is quite significant to how Days is approached, or at the very least, subsequently enjoyed. On the expansive seven and a half minute closing track All The Same, an extended mid-section of guitars is protracted to a wonderfully repetitive finale, like waves approaching a shore, or a paper bag falling to the ground in centrical patterns.


The latter can also be said for the gorgeous Municipality as circling guitars arch like thick brushstrokes over the verses and mid-sections. Frontman Martin Courtney possess a vocal that rides over these floating melodies while simultaneously containing enough weight to tie the two together in beautiful harmony. Part of the enjoyment that comes from Days is the possibility of surrendering to its charms and feeling safe in the knowledge that it will carry you along for the full length of its duration without dropping you suddenly. Its sound remains very similar throughout and there’s little in the way of deviation from that pre-ordained route. This, then, can make it difficult to note particular standouts. Whilst it’s true that Days can begin to feel a little repetitive in its final stages, it treads a well-worn path of coalescing its more melodic numbers at the start and its meandering, elusive ones at the end. I’ve heard arguments for and against this method of sequencing, since surely it makes sense to pepper your melodic gems over the course of the record as opposed to condensing them all at the front. On Days, however, this isn’t the case. This is a record that you can get lost in over and over again, so when songs like Younger Than Yesterday and Three Blocks find themselves near the end, we’ve already travelled so far and become firmly entrenched in that wonderful trademark guitar tone that feels so omnipresent throughout.


Much like in the way Talk Talk’s final two albums encouraged a deeper exploration of their sound on the listener’s part, Days invites us to surrender. Granted, this is a much more straight forward work than either Spirit Of Eden or Laughing Stock, but the idea is the same. Nevertheless, Days' strongest moments and its most enduring remain that opening triptych: Easy is the breeziest slice of indie surf rock of 2011 with lyrics and vocals that encourage lazy summer days spent exploring the suburbs deep within America. It’s now hard to perceive suburban life in rock music in a way that doesn’t attach an angst and feeling of bewilderment since Arcade Fire released The Suburbs a couple of years back, but Real Estate manage to avoid inviting stronger emotions. They touch on that angst only a little with Green Aisles, but even then the memories of days gone by feel completely romantic. The hat trick concludes with It’s Real, a shuffling surf rock pop number that builds irresistible vocals over waves of percussion.


Ultimately, Days remains that rare breed of record from an independent band that isn’t battling for your attention by trying to oust the competition or appeal to as wide an audience as possible. It’s likely that it was heard by many who found it boring, saccharin or bland, and that’s just fine. Real Estate have the potential to explore their sound and build upon what’s already here, but for now it’s nice to come across a band that seem so rested and content with where they’re currently at. The cover of Days is a photograph from Dan Graham’s 1965 Homes For America series, bound by the theme of rows and rows of houses. It is a pointed and considered choice that compliments the music perfectly. For their third album, I’d love to see them acquire an image by Baldessari or Ruscha, and make it fit the music similarly. I have no idea what that would sound like, but I’d be very curious to find out.

Posted 2 years ago & Filed under Days, Real Estate, Green Aisles, Easy, Municipality, 1 note

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1YRON aims to shine the spotlight on albums exactly one year after their release. Presented as an alternative to writing about them instantaneously, I hope to recall the album in question with a fondness of time having passed. Perhaps you may even be inspired to go back and discover something new.

Since physical and digital release dates often vary worldwide (the US commonly a day after the UK for example, or for smaller releases, sometimes weeks or months apart), these reviews will only be published on their UK or US physical release date (whichever comes first).

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