M83HURRY UP, WE’RE DREAMINGORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 17TH 20111YRON’S TOP 52 RECORDS OF 2011 RANKING: #37Bigger is not always better. It’s a matter of opinion and on Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming, M83 frontman Anthony Gonzales makes a convincing case for creating his most epic album so far. Since their 2001 self-titled debut, M83 have progressively built their own universe of sound with its roots in shoegaze, synthpop and dream pop. With each album this sound has expanded to colossal proportions, the peak of which is surely Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming. I say surely as I shudder to think how M83 could outsize this massive body of work on its inevitable follow-up. I remember hearing snippets of it just over a year ago and, coupled with the building hype that was circulating at the time, found myself very excited to hear the whole thing. I’m sad to say that a year’s worth of listening hasn’t changed my initial reaction, and that’s something that I can attribute to ambitions running a little too far. The result is a sound that is astonishing in its scope and splendour yet frequently frustrating and overwhelming, too. The entire run time of Dreaming could fit onto a single disc, but instead we’re treated to two. This is clearly an aesthetic decision and a message to its audience that M83 have really considered the arrangement of these songs, sequencing them in order to tell a story and evoke a response.To be fair to M83, their sound has always been incredibly bombastic and captivated just as many people as it repelled. I’ve always found myself somewhere in the middle and Dreaming does nothing to change that, even when I thought for a time that it would. It is epic in many ways and wholly fulfilling in the sense of hearing it through headphones, eclipsing anything and everything around. Yet it ultimately leaves me hollow via its emotional connection, and that’s the most important thing about hearing something that makes me want to return for more. Near its end, there’s a track called Echoes Of Mine that features spoken word French dialogue interspersed with crashing guitars and drums that literally hurt my ears. Its appearance this late on feels like a facade, a wake-up call to those who may have lost interest early on. It’s also completely devoid of melody like so much here and feels completely overblown. Even the slower, quieter numbers have a way of scaring me off by their alarming size. Where The Boats Go is the sound of low end synths with the volume pushed to the max, so even when I’m listening to it at a relatively low volume I feel as though something is about to explode and scare the living daylights out of me. That, ultimately, doesn’t happen on this song and the piano near the end is just lovely, but its flow into the saccharin night time ballad Wait is somewhat anti-climactic.What’s most frustrating is that Dreaming boasts one of the greatest triptychs of opening songs in recent memory. Intro features the vocals of Zola Jesus and is a truly spectacular display of restraint and heightened tension, climaxing with shimmering synths and heavenly backing vocals. One can see why, with a belting opening song such as this, you’d expect similar results throughout the rest of the album. This winning streak continues with Midnight City, the album’s lead single and M83’s biggest stab at commercial success thus far with its calming verses juxtaposed by exploding fireworks in the chorus and a sax solo to round things out neatly. Reunion, meanwhile, tears across the night sky with its muscular guitars, heart-racing chorus and a vocal delivery from Gonzales that is pitch perfect in every way.There are other brief flashes of brilliance across Dreaming, yet these remain, precisely, brief. Train To Pluton, Another Wave From You and Klaus I Love You all bestow wonderful melodies and some really interesting directions, yet none of them last longer than two minutes. It’s frustrating to imagine how brilliant they could be if they were given more time to really blossom. This remains my biggest problem with Dreaming. For a record so hyperbolic in every way imaginable, I’m left cold by the selection and editing process. It’s a grand piece of work that covers a lot of ground over its two discs and no doubt proved to be the musical highlight of 2011 for many. Maybe this is one of those epic double albums that will reveal itself to me slowly over the coming years. I would be the first to welcome it with belated, open arms. Meanwhile, I’m more than content to stand by my word that Dreaming is a flawed album and that M83 work best when remaining concise yet explosive.

M83
HURRY UP, WE’RE DREAMING

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 17TH 2011
1YRON’S TOP 52 RECORDS OF 2011 RANKING: #37


Bigger is not always better. It’s a matter of opinion and on Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming, M83 frontman Anthony Gonzales makes a convincing case for creating his most epic album so far. Since their 2001 self-titled debut, M83 have progressively built their own universe of sound with its roots in shoegaze, synthpop and dream pop. With each album this sound has expanded to colossal proportions, the peak of which is surely Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming. I say surely as I shudder to think how M83 could outsize this massive body of work on its inevitable follow-up. I remember hearing snippets of it just over a year ago and, coupled with the building hype that was circulating at the time, found myself very excited to hear the whole thing. I’m sad to say that a year’s worth of listening hasn’t changed my initial reaction, and that’s something that I can attribute to ambitions running a little too far. The result is a sound that is astonishing in its scope and splendour yet frequently frustrating and overwhelming, too. The entire run time of Dreaming could fit onto a single disc, but instead we’re treated to two. This is clearly an aesthetic decision and a message to its audience that M83 have really considered the arrangement of these songs, sequencing them in order to tell a story and evoke a response.


To be fair to M83, their sound has always been incredibly bombastic and captivated just as many people as it repelled. I’ve always found myself somewhere in the middle and Dreaming does nothing to change that, even when I thought for a time that it would. It is epic in many ways and wholly fulfilling in the sense of hearing it through headphones, eclipsing anything and everything around. Yet it ultimately leaves me hollow via its emotional connection, and that’s the most important thing about hearing something that makes me want to return for more. Near its end, there’s a track called Echoes Of Mine that features spoken word French dialogue interspersed with crashing guitars and drums that literally hurt my ears. Its appearance this late on feels like a facade, a wake-up call to those who may have lost interest early on. It’s also completely devoid of melody like so much here and feels completely overblown. Even the slower, quieter numbers have a way of scaring me off by their alarming size. Where The Boats Go is the sound of low end synths with the volume pushed to the max, so even when I’m listening to it at a relatively low volume I feel as though something is about to explode and scare the living daylights out of me. That, ultimately, doesn’t happen on this song and the piano near the end is just lovely, but its flow into the saccharin night time ballad Wait is somewhat anti-climactic.


What’s most frustrating is that Dreaming boasts one of the greatest triptychs of opening songs in recent memory. Intro features the vocals of Zola Jesus and is a truly spectacular display of restraint and heightened tension, climaxing with shimmering synths and heavenly backing vocals. One can see why, with a belting opening song such as this, you’d expect similar results throughout the rest of the album. This winning streak continues with Midnight City, the album’s lead single and M83’s biggest stab at commercial success thus far with its calming verses juxtaposed by exploding fireworks in the chorus and a sax solo to round things out neatly. Reunion, meanwhile, tears across the night sky with its muscular guitars, heart-racing chorus and a vocal delivery from Gonzales that is pitch perfect in every way.


There are other brief flashes of brilliance across Dreaming, yet these remain, precisely, brief. Train To Pluton, Another Wave From You and Klaus I Love You all bestow wonderful melodies and some really interesting directions, yet none of them last longer than two minutes. It’s frustrating to imagine how brilliant they could be if they were given more time to really blossom. This remains my biggest problem with Dreaming. For a record so hyperbolic in every way imaginable, I’m left cold by the selection and editing process. It’s a grand piece of work that covers a lot of ground over its two discs and no doubt proved to be the musical highlight of 2011 for many. Maybe this is one of those epic double albums that will reveal itself to me slowly over the coming years. I would be the first to welcome it with belated, open arms. Meanwhile, I’m more than content to stand by my word that Dreaming is a flawed album and that M83 work best when remaining concise yet explosive.

M83HURRY UP, WE’RE DREAMINGORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 17TH 20111YRON’S TOP 52 RECORDS OF 2011 RANKING: #37Bigger is not always better. It’s a matter of opinion and on Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming, M83 frontman Anthony Gonzales makes a convincing case for creating his most epic album so far. Since their 2001 self-titled debut, M83 have progressively built their own universe of sound with its roots in shoegaze, synthpop and dream pop. With each album this sound has expanded to colossal proportions, the peak of which is surely Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming. I say surely as I shudder to think how M83 could outsize this massive body of work on its inevitable follow-up. I remember hearing snippets of it just over a year ago and, coupled with the building hype that was circulating at the time, found myself very excited to hear the whole thing. I’m sad to say that a year’s worth of listening hasn’t changed my initial reaction, and that’s something that I can attribute to ambitions running a little too far. The result is a sound that is astonishing in its scope and splendour yet frequently frustrating and overwhelming, too. The entire run time of Dreaming could fit onto a single disc, but instead we’re treated to two. This is clearly an aesthetic decision and a message to its audience that M83 have really considered the arrangement of these songs, sequencing them in order to tell a story and evoke a response.To be fair to M83, their sound has always been incredibly bombastic and captivated just as many people as it repelled. I’ve always found myself somewhere in the middle and Dreaming does nothing to change that, even when I thought for a time that it would. It is epic in many ways and wholly fulfilling in the sense of hearing it through headphones, eclipsing anything and everything around. Yet it ultimately leaves me hollow via its emotional connection, and that’s the most important thing about hearing something that makes me want to return for more. Near its end, there’s a track called Echoes Of Mine that features spoken word French dialogue interspersed with crashing guitars and drums that literally hurt my ears. Its appearance this late on feels like a facade, a wake-up call to those who may have lost interest early on. It’s also completely devoid of melody like so much here and feels completely overblown. Even the slower, quieter numbers have a way of scaring me off by their alarming size. Where The Boats Go is the sound of low end synths with the volume pushed to the max, so even when I’m listening to it at a relatively low volume I feel as though something is about to explode and scare the living daylights out of me. That, ultimately, doesn’t happen on this song and the piano near the end is just lovely, but its flow into the saccharin night time ballad Wait is somewhat anti-climactic.What’s most frustrating is that Dreaming boasts one of the greatest triptychs of opening songs in recent memory. Intro features the vocals of Zola Jesus and is a truly spectacular display of restraint and heightened tension, climaxing with shimmering synths and heavenly backing vocals. One can see why, with a belting opening song such as this, you’d expect similar results throughout the rest of the album. This winning streak continues with Midnight City, the album’s lead single and M83’s biggest stab at commercial success thus far with its calming verses juxtaposed by exploding fireworks in the chorus and a sax solo to round things out neatly. Reunion, meanwhile, tears across the night sky with its muscular guitars, heart-racing chorus and a vocal delivery from Gonzales that is pitch perfect in every way.There are other brief flashes of brilliance across Dreaming, yet these remain, precisely, brief. Train To Pluton, Another Wave From You and Klaus I Love You all bestow wonderful melodies and some really interesting directions, yet none of them last longer than two minutes. It’s frustrating to imagine how brilliant they could be if they were given more time to really blossom. This remains my biggest problem with Dreaming. For a record so hyperbolic in every way imaginable, I’m left cold by the selection and editing process. It’s a grand piece of work that covers a lot of ground over its two discs and no doubt proved to be the musical highlight of 2011 for many. Maybe this is one of those epic double albums that will reveal itself to me slowly over the coming years. I would be the first to welcome it with belated, open arms. Meanwhile, I’m more than content to stand by my word that Dreaming is a flawed album and that M83 work best when remaining concise yet explosive.

M83
HURRY UP, WE’RE DREAMING

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 17TH 2011
1YRON’S TOP 52 RECORDS OF 2011 RANKING: #37


Bigger is not always better. It’s a matter of opinion and on Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming, M83 frontman Anthony Gonzales makes a convincing case for creating his most epic album so far. Since their 2001 self-titled debut, M83 have progressively built their own universe of sound with its roots in shoegaze, synthpop and dream pop. With each album this sound has expanded to colossal proportions, the peak of which is surely Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming. I say surely as I shudder to think how M83 could outsize this massive body of work on its inevitable follow-up. I remember hearing snippets of it just over a year ago and, coupled with the building hype that was circulating at the time, found myself very excited to hear the whole thing. I’m sad to say that a year’s worth of listening hasn’t changed my initial reaction, and that’s something that I can attribute to ambitions running a little too far. The result is a sound that is astonishing in its scope and splendour yet frequently frustrating and overwhelming, too. The entire run time of Dreaming could fit onto a single disc, but instead we’re treated to two. This is clearly an aesthetic decision and a message to its audience that M83 have really considered the arrangement of these songs, sequencing them in order to tell a story and evoke a response.


To be fair to M83, their sound has always been incredibly bombastic and captivated just as many people as it repelled. I’ve always found myself somewhere in the middle and Dreaming does nothing to change that, even when I thought for a time that it would. It is epic in many ways and wholly fulfilling in the sense of hearing it through headphones, eclipsing anything and everything around. Yet it ultimately leaves me hollow via its emotional connection, and that’s the most important thing about hearing something that makes me want to return for more. Near its end, there’s a track called Echoes Of Mine that features spoken word French dialogue interspersed with crashing guitars and drums that literally hurt my ears. Its appearance this late on feels like a facade, a wake-up call to those who may have lost interest early on. It’s also completely devoid of melody like so much here and feels completely overblown. Even the slower, quieter numbers have a way of scaring me off by their alarming size. Where The Boats Go is the sound of low end synths with the volume pushed to the max, so even when I’m listening to it at a relatively low volume I feel as though something is about to explode and scare the living daylights out of me. That, ultimately, doesn’t happen on this song and the piano near the end is just lovely, but its flow into the saccharin night time ballad Wait is somewhat anti-climactic.


What’s most frustrating is that Dreaming boasts one of the greatest triptychs of opening songs in recent memory. Intro features the vocals of Zola Jesus and is a truly spectacular display of restraint and heightened tension, climaxing with shimmering synths and heavenly backing vocals. One can see why, with a belting opening song such as this, you’d expect similar results throughout the rest of the album. This winning streak continues with Midnight City, the album’s lead single and M83’s biggest stab at commercial success thus far with its calming verses juxtaposed by exploding fireworks in the chorus and a sax solo to round things out neatly. Reunion, meanwhile, tears across the night sky with its muscular guitars, heart-racing chorus and a vocal delivery from Gonzales that is pitch perfect in every way.


There are other brief flashes of brilliance across Dreaming, yet these remain, precisely, brief. Train To Pluton, Another Wave From You and Klaus I Love You all bestow wonderful melodies and some really interesting directions, yet none of them last longer than two minutes. It’s frustrating to imagine how brilliant they could be if they were given more time to really blossom. This remains my biggest problem with Dreaming. For a record so hyperbolic in every way imaginable, I’m left cold by the selection and editing process. It’s a grand piece of work that covers a lot of ground over its two discs and no doubt proved to be the musical highlight of 2011 for many. Maybe this is one of those epic double albums that will reveal itself to me slowly over the coming years. I would be the first to welcome it with belated, open arms. Meanwhile, I’m more than content to stand by my word that Dreaming is a flawed album and that M83 work best when remaining concise yet explosive.

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About:

1YRON aims to shine the spotlight on albums exactly one year after their release. Presented as an alternative to writing about them instantaneously, I hope to recall the album in question with a fondness of time having passed. Perhaps you may even be inspired to go back and discover something new.

Since physical and digital release dates often vary worldwide (the US commonly a day after the UK for example, or for smaller releases, sometimes weeks or months apart), these reviews will only be published on their UK or US physical release date (whichever comes first).

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