YOUTH LAGOONTHE YEAR OF HIBERNATIONORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: SEPTEMBER 27TH 2011It probably wasn’t meant to happen like this. Trevor Powers, the man behind Youth Lagoon, spent most of late 2010 recording the eight tracks that would form The Year Of Hibernation and planned to release it all for free online the following summer. That’s until a couple of tracks circulated around blogs, making Youth Lagoon a pretty big deal in a short space of time. Before long, Powers had a record deal and The Year Of Hibernation was scheduled for an official fall 2011 release. The back story of how Powers came to record these songs is both rather captivating and endearing. An English major at Boise State University in Idaho, 22 year old Powers has referred to 2010 as a difficult year both mentally and emotionally through which he underwent a sort of incubation period, feeling isolated from the people around him. All of these emotions feel present on the record, but they would mean little if Powers were incapable of communicating to us on that most basic of instinctive reactions. It just so happens that The Year Of Hibernation can do just that, but it can also transport the listener to their very own little hideaway by way of its decidely lo-fi recording process and sense of unabashed honesty.One of the most common mistakes surrounding the story of Hibernation is that it was recorded in Powers’ bedroom. It’s telling that ‘bedroom pop’ has become a term so commonly applied to music that sounds like this, and perhaps more than anything released in the past year Hibernation ascribes to that sound most accurately. Unlike many other emerging sounds, bedroom pop goes straight for the heart as well as the ears. Images of struggling artists sat alone in their bedrooms aspiring to bigger things is an incredibly romantic image. Tie it together with wistful and incredibly earnest music and such an image can be hard to shake. As it turns out, Powers wrote these songs in his bedroom but recorded them in a friend’s garage over Christmas, so it indeed remains bedroom pop to a degree. Where that process of composing begins and ends is another argument altogether, but Hibernation most definitely invites feelings of the romantic. Heavily-hyped new artists often find themselves in the position of defending their rise to prominence after one year, yet Youth Lagoon seem to have avoided such trappings. Due to its incredibly honest and naked approach to songwriting and recording, Hibernation feels like one of those records that will remain unaffected by any sort of critical backlash.The music itself is beautiful first and almost painful second. It is filled with moments of purity and bare bones arrangements that escalate across their run times, peaking with rising vocals that are both resoundingly clear and distant. Powers is obviously blessed with a unique and powerful vocal range that is all the more affecting with such lyrical content as, “You make friends quickly, but not me” on opening track Posters, right before the tempo kicks in and dances out to a joyous instrumental resolution. July, perhaps the centrepiece of the record and first track to gain Powers widespread recognition, builds slowly to a wonderfully poignant climax as he recalls the past and present of two Fourth of July evenings. Hibernation remains within a very similar aesthetic and there is the sense that Powers could’ve pushed himself a little further, yet it’s a record that is content remaining in one place and makes no apologies for wallowing in a state of nostalgia-tinged reverie. On Daydream he protracts a beautiful sonic landscape with a galloping melody that is inverted to a chugging plod on Montana, the track following immediately.Taking a sample from just these two songs, it’s clear that Youth Lagoon’s sound won’t be for everyone. It’s perhaps easier to sling mud at Powers than to praise his qualities, since those qualities are rarely defined and take a while to emerge. Hibernation remains a record that acts on its listeners’ instinct, playing on something deep inside that cannot always be pin-pointed. It’s affecting because it relates to every single person’s thoughts and reactions to the transition between childhood and adulthood. Those feelings are no doubt tinged with uncertainty, bewilderment and fear. Above all, it’s fucking painful. Growing pains are that necessary part of human development. When the harsh realities of the real world collide with the security blanket of childhood, the contrast can be overwhelming and Hibernation translates that perfectly. The solitary whistling on a song like Afternoon could soundtrack a baby’s first steps home video. Then the guitar comes in and tears it all up. Powers will no doubt have difficulty putting together a follow up record that truly outshines this, but it will nevertheless be another aspect of his maturity as an artist second and as a person first.

YOUTH LAGOON
THE YEAR OF HIBERNATION

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: SEPTEMBER 27TH 2011


It probably wasn’t meant to happen like this. Trevor Powers, the man behind Youth Lagoon, spent most of late 2010 recording the eight tracks that would form The Year Of Hibernation and planned to release it all for free online the following summer. That’s until a couple of tracks circulated around blogs, making Youth Lagoon a pretty big deal in a short space of time. Before long, Powers had a record deal and The Year Of Hibernation was scheduled for an official fall 2011 release. The back story of how Powers came to record these songs is both rather captivating and endearing. An English major at Boise State University in Idaho, 22 year old Powers has referred to 2010 as a difficult year both mentally and emotionally through which he underwent a sort of incubation period, feeling isolated from the people around him. All of these emotions feel present on the record, but they would mean little if Powers were incapable of communicating to us on that most basic of instinctive reactions. It just so happens that The Year Of Hibernation can do just that, but it can also transport the listener to their very own little hideaway by way of its decidely lo-fi recording process and sense of unabashed honesty.


One of the most common mistakes surrounding the story of Hibernation is that it was recorded in Powers’ bedroom. It’s telling that ‘bedroom pop’ has become a term so commonly applied to music that sounds like this, and perhaps more than anything released in the past year Hibernation ascribes to that sound most accurately. Unlike many other emerging sounds, bedroom pop goes straight for the heart as well as the ears. Images of struggling artists sat alone in their bedrooms aspiring to bigger things is an incredibly romantic image. Tie it together with wistful and incredibly earnest music and such an image can be hard to shake. As it turns out, Powers wrote these songs in his bedroom but recorded them in a friend’s garage over Christmas, so it indeed remains bedroom pop to a degree. Where that process of composing begins and ends is another argument altogether, but Hibernation most definitely invites feelings of the romantic. Heavily-hyped new artists often find themselves in the position of defending their rise to prominence after one year, yet Youth Lagoon seem to have avoided such trappings. Due to its incredibly honest and naked approach to songwriting and recording, Hibernation feels like one of those records that will remain unaffected by any sort of critical backlash.


The music itself is beautiful first and almost painful second. It is filled with moments of purity and bare bones arrangements that escalate across their run times, peaking with rising vocals that are both resoundingly clear and distant. Powers is obviously blessed with a unique and powerful vocal range that is all the more affecting with such lyrical content as, “You make friends quickly, but not me” on opening track Posters, right before the tempo kicks in and dances out to a joyous instrumental resolution. July, perhaps the centrepiece of the record and first track to gain Powers widespread recognition, builds slowly to a wonderfully poignant climax as he recalls the past and present of two Fourth of July evenings. Hibernation remains within a very similar aesthetic and there is the sense that Powers could’ve pushed himself a little further, yet it’s a record that is content remaining in one place and makes no apologies for wallowing in a state of nostalgia-tinged reverie. On Daydream he protracts a beautiful sonic landscape with a galloping melody that is inverted to a chugging plod on Montana, the track following immediately.


Taking a sample from just these two songs, it’s clear that Youth Lagoon’s sound won’t be for everyone. It’s perhaps easier to sling mud at Powers than to praise his qualities, since those qualities are rarely defined and take a while to emerge. Hibernation remains a record that acts on its listeners’ instinct, playing on something deep inside that cannot always be pin-pointed. It’s affecting because it relates to every single person’s thoughts and reactions to the transition between childhood and adulthood. Those feelings are no doubt tinged with uncertainty, bewilderment and fear. Above all, it’s fucking painful. Growing pains are that necessary part of human development. When the harsh realities of the real world collide with the security blanket of childhood, the contrast can be overwhelming and Hibernation translates that perfectly. The solitary whistling on a song like Afternoon could soundtrack a baby’s first steps home video. Then the guitar comes in and tears it all up. Powers will no doubt have difficulty putting together a follow up record that truly outshines this, but it will nevertheless be another aspect of his maturity as an artist second and as a person first.

YOUTH LAGOONTHE YEAR OF HIBERNATIONORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: SEPTEMBER 27TH 2011It probably wasn’t meant to happen like this. Trevor Powers, the man behind Youth Lagoon, spent most of late 2010 recording the eight tracks that would form The Year Of Hibernation and planned to release it all for free online the following summer. That’s until a couple of tracks circulated around blogs, making Youth Lagoon a pretty big deal in a short space of time. Before long, Powers had a record deal and The Year Of Hibernation was scheduled for an official fall 2011 release. The back story of how Powers came to record these songs is both rather captivating and endearing. An English major at Boise State University in Idaho, 22 year old Powers has referred to 2010 as a difficult year both mentally and emotionally through which he underwent a sort of incubation period, feeling isolated from the people around him. All of these emotions feel present on the record, but they would mean little if Powers were incapable of communicating to us on that most basic of instinctive reactions. It just so happens that The Year Of Hibernation can do just that, but it can also transport the listener to their very own little hideaway by way of its decidely lo-fi recording process and sense of unabashed honesty.One of the most common mistakes surrounding the story of Hibernation is that it was recorded in Powers’ bedroom. It’s telling that ‘bedroom pop’ has become a term so commonly applied to music that sounds like this, and perhaps more than anything released in the past year Hibernation ascribes to that sound most accurately. Unlike many other emerging sounds, bedroom pop goes straight for the heart as well as the ears. Images of struggling artists sat alone in their bedrooms aspiring to bigger things is an incredibly romantic image. Tie it together with wistful and incredibly earnest music and such an image can be hard to shake. As it turns out, Powers wrote these songs in his bedroom but recorded them in a friend’s garage over Christmas, so it indeed remains bedroom pop to a degree. Where that process of composing begins and ends is another argument altogether, but Hibernation most definitely invites feelings of the romantic. Heavily-hyped new artists often find themselves in the position of defending their rise to prominence after one year, yet Youth Lagoon seem to have avoided such trappings. Due to its incredibly honest and naked approach to songwriting and recording, Hibernation feels like one of those records that will remain unaffected by any sort of critical backlash.The music itself is beautiful first and almost painful second. It is filled with moments of purity and bare bones arrangements that escalate across their run times, peaking with rising vocals that are both resoundingly clear and distant. Powers is obviously blessed with a unique and powerful vocal range that is all the more affecting with such lyrical content as, “You make friends quickly, but not me” on opening track Posters, right before the tempo kicks in and dances out to a joyous instrumental resolution. July, perhaps the centrepiece of the record and first track to gain Powers widespread recognition, builds slowly to a wonderfully poignant climax as he recalls the past and present of two Fourth of July evenings. Hibernation remains within a very similar aesthetic and there is the sense that Powers could’ve pushed himself a little further, yet it’s a record that is content remaining in one place and makes no apologies for wallowing in a state of nostalgia-tinged reverie. On Daydream he protracts a beautiful sonic landscape with a galloping melody that is inverted to a chugging plod on Montana, the track following immediately.Taking a sample from just these two songs, it’s clear that Youth Lagoon’s sound won’t be for everyone. It’s perhaps easier to sling mud at Powers than to praise his qualities, since those qualities are rarely defined and take a while to emerge. Hibernation remains a record that acts on its listeners’ instinct, playing on something deep inside that cannot always be pin-pointed. It’s affecting because it relates to every single person’s thoughts and reactions to the transition between childhood and adulthood. Those feelings are no doubt tinged with uncertainty, bewilderment and fear. Above all, it’s fucking painful. Growing pains are that necessary part of human development. When the harsh realities of the real world collide with the security blanket of childhood, the contrast can be overwhelming and Hibernation translates that perfectly. The solitary whistling on a song like Afternoon could soundtrack a baby’s first steps home video. Then the guitar comes in and tears it all up. Powers will no doubt have difficulty putting together a follow up record that truly outshines this, but it will nevertheless be another aspect of his maturity as an artist second and as a person first.

YOUTH LAGOON
THE YEAR OF HIBERNATION

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: SEPTEMBER 27TH 2011


It probably wasn’t meant to happen like this. Trevor Powers, the man behind Youth Lagoon, spent most of late 2010 recording the eight tracks that would form The Year Of Hibernation and planned to release it all for free online the following summer. That’s until a couple of tracks circulated around blogs, making Youth Lagoon a pretty big deal in a short space of time. Before long, Powers had a record deal and The Year Of Hibernation was scheduled for an official fall 2011 release. The back story of how Powers came to record these songs is both rather captivating and endearing. An English major at Boise State University in Idaho, 22 year old Powers has referred to 2010 as a difficult year both mentally and emotionally through which he underwent a sort of incubation period, feeling isolated from the people around him. All of these emotions feel present on the record, but they would mean little if Powers were incapable of communicating to us on that most basic of instinctive reactions. It just so happens that The Year Of Hibernation can do just that, but it can also transport the listener to their very own little hideaway by way of its decidely lo-fi recording process and sense of unabashed honesty.


One of the most common mistakes surrounding the story of Hibernation is that it was recorded in Powers’ bedroom. It’s telling that ‘bedroom pop’ has become a term so commonly applied to music that sounds like this, and perhaps more than anything released in the past year Hibernation ascribes to that sound most accurately. Unlike many other emerging sounds, bedroom pop goes straight for the heart as well as the ears. Images of struggling artists sat alone in their bedrooms aspiring to bigger things is an incredibly romantic image. Tie it together with wistful and incredibly earnest music and such an image can be hard to shake. As it turns out, Powers wrote these songs in his bedroom but recorded them in a friend’s garage over Christmas, so it indeed remains bedroom pop to a degree. Where that process of composing begins and ends is another argument altogether, but Hibernation most definitely invites feelings of the romantic. Heavily-hyped new artists often find themselves in the position of defending their rise to prominence after one year, yet Youth Lagoon seem to have avoided such trappings. Due to its incredibly honest and naked approach to songwriting and recording, Hibernation feels like one of those records that will remain unaffected by any sort of critical backlash.


The music itself is beautiful first and almost painful second. It is filled with moments of purity and bare bones arrangements that escalate across their run times, peaking with rising vocals that are both resoundingly clear and distant. Powers is obviously blessed with a unique and powerful vocal range that is all the more affecting with such lyrical content as, “You make friends quickly, but not me” on opening track Posters, right before the tempo kicks in and dances out to a joyous instrumental resolution. July, perhaps the centrepiece of the record and first track to gain Powers widespread recognition, builds slowly to a wonderfully poignant climax as he recalls the past and present of two Fourth of July evenings. Hibernation remains within a very similar aesthetic and there is the sense that Powers could’ve pushed himself a little further, yet it’s a record that is content remaining in one place and makes no apologies for wallowing in a state of nostalgia-tinged reverie. On Daydream he protracts a beautiful sonic landscape with a galloping melody that is inverted to a chugging plod on Montana, the track following immediately.


Taking a sample from just these two songs, it’s clear that Youth Lagoon’s sound won’t be for everyone. It’s perhaps easier to sling mud at Powers than to praise his qualities, since those qualities are rarely defined and take a while to emerge. Hibernation remains a record that acts on its listeners’ instinct, playing on something deep inside that cannot always be pin-pointed. It’s affecting because it relates to every single person’s thoughts and reactions to the transition between childhood and adulthood. Those feelings are no doubt tinged with uncertainty, bewilderment and fear. Above all, it’s fucking painful. Growing pains are that necessary part of human development. When the harsh realities of the real world collide with the security blanket of childhood, the contrast can be overwhelming and Hibernation translates that perfectly. The solitary whistling on a song like Afternoon could soundtrack a baby’s first steps home video. Then the guitar comes in and tears it all up. Powers will no doubt have difficulty putting together a follow up record that truly outshines this, but it will nevertheless be another aspect of his maturity as an artist second and as a person first.

Notes:

  1. brandonfuckingcampbell reblogged this from 1yron and added:
    Snagged this bad boy today. Add one more to the vinyl collection.
  2. charlieniel reblogged this from 1yron
  3. notyourdadsbitch reblogged this from 1yron
  4. 1yron posted this

About:

1YRON aims to shine the spotlight on albums exactly one year after their release. Presented as an alternative to writing about them instantaneously, I hope to recall the album in question with a fondness of time having passed. Perhaps you may even be inspired to go back and discover something new.

Since physical and digital release dates often vary worldwide (the US commonly a day after the UK for example, or for smaller releases, sometimes weeks or months apart), these reviews will only be published on their UK or US physical release date (whichever comes first).

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