CANTDREAMS COME TRUEORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: SEPTEMBER 12TH 2011Grizzly Bear is made up of four very talented individuals and together they make a convincing case for one of the greatest bands around today, yet there’s one member that has always stood above the others when it comes to distinction. Chris Taylor has served as producer on both Yellow House and Veckatimest, displaying his talents for production as well as being a multi-instrumentalist. Yet he’s also worked with a multitude of artists, from TV On The Radio to Dirty Projectors and Twin Shadow to The Morning Benders. That’s before mentioning his work with Department Of Eagles and the founding of his own record label (Terrible Records) in 2009. All of this points to Dreams Come True, the first solo release from Taylor under the CANT moniker. His work with Grizzly Bear is carved out by ambitious soundscapes and epic instrumentation that feels continually labored over, yet Dreams Come True explores a different path. Dabbling with electronica and a variety of percussion instruments, Taylor encourages a delicate, fragile atmosphere that really takes a lot of work to crack.Initial listens can prove daunting or even uninteresting depending on your willingness to persevere, yet there’s a wealth of knowledge and talent beneath Dreams' smoldering surface that's worth exploring. Opening track Too Late, Too Far moves in circles with an infectious rhythm section complete with hand-claps and tribal beats, complemented by a shifting vocal line that proves to be the only melody here that remains in the mind after an initial run through. There’s a similar effect at work on Believe with its bass guitar and glittering synth lines, recalling classic Prince and, strangely enough, Kate Bush’s And So Is Love. One would be right in thinking that Taylor’s work as producer on Twin Shadow’s brilliant record Forget from roughly a year before this release has spilled over to his own solo effort. That’s no bad thing and songs like Believe seem to serve as darker, more sinister brother companions to that record’s highlights such as When We’re Dancing. There are moments of sheer beauty here, and Taylor’s vocals feel particularly well suited to the record’s muted shades. She Found A Way Out opens gently with shivering vocals and subdued guitar work that strengthens as it advances before an array of synths dazzle to a chilling conclusion. It’s a rare, lavish moment on a record that prefers to move at its own pace and nestle safely in a comfortable niche. It’s tempting to consider these songs as templates or demos for something much larger, for Dreams is truly the sound of an artist at work in the studio, biding his time and mulling over the subtlest of textures.The majority of Dreams remains elusive and it’s hard to pinpoint what it is that makes virtually every song here such a comforting experience to hear over and over. Answer builds around disparate percussion elements and breathy vocals to create a rhythmic frame that displays Taylor’s ability to shift mood and tempo many times over the course of a single song without revealing the slightest bit of pretense, which is a skill all on its own. Dreams is balances its approach perfectly, tempering its faster moments by those of acoustic calm. BANG couldn’t be any further than its title suggests with its gentle acoustic pickings, (brokencollar) is a beautiful piano instrumental and Rises Silent blossoms into a lofty arrangement complete with chilling vocals in its final minute.Dreams is definitely not for the uninitiated and Taylor has chosen wisely to distance himself from Grizzly Bear with this collection of more avant-garde, new wave offerings. It never goes out of its way to appease to the largest audience it possibly can and occassionally suffers from feeling a little unwelcoming at times, yet there is comfort to be found in its conscientious layers of sound. One might even associate feelings of solace with its patient nature. With Grizzly Bear’s new record only a week away, it’s reassuring to know that Dreams stands in a completely different world. Given the fact that it slipped by most ears first time around and has largely been forgotten about after one year makes it all the more worth revisiting.

CANT
DREAMS COME TRUE

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: SEPTEMBER 12TH 2011


Grizzly Bear is made up of four very talented individuals and together they make a convincing case for one of the greatest bands around today, yet there’s one member that has always stood above the others when it comes to distinction. Chris Taylor has served as producer on both Yellow House and Veckatimest, displaying his talents for production as well as being a multi-instrumentalist. Yet he’s also worked with a multitude of artists, from TV On The Radio to Dirty Projectors and Twin Shadow to The Morning Benders. That’s before mentioning his work with Department Of Eagles and the founding of his own record label (Terrible Records) in 2009. All of this points to Dreams Come True, the first solo release from Taylor under the CANT moniker. His work with Grizzly Bear is carved out by ambitious soundscapes and epic instrumentation that feels continually labored over, yet Dreams Come True explores a different path. Dabbling with electronica and a variety of percussion instruments, Taylor encourages a delicate, fragile atmosphere that really takes a lot of work to crack.


Initial listens can prove daunting or even uninteresting depending on your willingness to persevere, yet there’s a wealth of knowledge and talent beneath Dreams' smoldering surface that's worth exploring. Opening track Too Late, Too Far moves in circles with an infectious rhythm section complete with hand-claps and tribal beats, complemented by a shifting vocal line that proves to be the only melody here that remains in the mind after an initial run through. There’s a similar effect at work on Believe with its bass guitar and glittering synth lines, recalling classic Prince and, strangely enough, Kate Bush’s And So Is Love. One would be right in thinking that Taylor’s work as producer on Twin Shadow’s brilliant record Forget from roughly a year before this release has spilled over to his own solo effort. That’s no bad thing and songs like Believe seem to serve as darker, more sinister brother companions to that record’s highlights such as When We’re Dancing. There are moments of sheer beauty here, and Taylor’s vocals feel particularly well suited to the record’s muted shades. She Found A Way Out opens gently with shivering vocals and subdued guitar work that strengthens as it advances before an array of synths dazzle to a chilling conclusion. It’s a rare, lavish moment on a record that prefers to move at its own pace and nestle safely in a comfortable niche. It’s tempting to consider these songs as templates or demos for something much larger, for Dreams is truly the sound of an artist at work in the studio, biding his time and mulling over the subtlest of textures.


The majority of Dreams remains elusive and it’s hard to pinpoint what it is that makes virtually every song here such a comforting experience to hear over and over. Answer builds around disparate percussion elements and breathy vocals to create a rhythmic frame that displays Taylor’s ability to shift mood and tempo many times over the course of a single song without revealing the slightest bit of pretense, which is a skill all on its own. Dreams is balances its approach perfectly, tempering its faster moments by those of acoustic calm. BANG couldn’t be any further than its title suggests with its gentle acoustic pickings, (brokencollar) is a beautiful piano instrumental and Rises Silent blossoms into a lofty arrangement complete with chilling vocals in its final minute.


Dreams is definitely not for the uninitiated and Taylor has chosen wisely to distance himself from Grizzly Bear with this collection of more avant-garde, new wave offerings. It never goes out of its way to appease to the largest audience it possibly can and occassionally suffers from feeling a little unwelcoming at times, yet there is comfort to be found in its conscientious layers of sound. One might even associate feelings of solace with its patient nature. With Grizzly Bear’s new record only a week away, it’s reassuring to know that Dreams stands in a completely different world. Given the fact that it slipped by most ears first time around and has largely been forgotten about after one year makes it all the more worth revisiting.

CANTDREAMS COME TRUEORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: SEPTEMBER 12TH 2011Grizzly Bear is made up of four very talented individuals and together they make a convincing case for one of the greatest bands around today, yet there’s one member that has always stood above the others when it comes to distinction. Chris Taylor has served as producer on both Yellow House and Veckatimest, displaying his talents for production as well as being a multi-instrumentalist. Yet he’s also worked with a multitude of artists, from TV On The Radio to Dirty Projectors and Twin Shadow to The Morning Benders. That’s before mentioning his work with Department Of Eagles and the founding of his own record label (Terrible Records) in 2009. All of this points to Dreams Come True, the first solo release from Taylor under the CANT moniker. His work with Grizzly Bear is carved out by ambitious soundscapes and epic instrumentation that feels continually labored over, yet Dreams Come True explores a different path. Dabbling with electronica and a variety of percussion instruments, Taylor encourages a delicate, fragile atmosphere that really takes a lot of work to crack.Initial listens can prove daunting or even uninteresting depending on your willingness to persevere, yet there’s a wealth of knowledge and talent beneath Dreams' smoldering surface that's worth exploring. Opening track Too Late, Too Far moves in circles with an infectious rhythm section complete with hand-claps and tribal beats, complemented by a shifting vocal line that proves to be the only melody here that remains in the mind after an initial run through. There’s a similar effect at work on Believe with its bass guitar and glittering synth lines, recalling classic Prince and, strangely enough, Kate Bush’s And So Is Love. One would be right in thinking that Taylor’s work as producer on Twin Shadow’s brilliant record Forget from roughly a year before this release has spilled over to his own solo effort. That’s no bad thing and songs like Believe seem to serve as darker, more sinister brother companions to that record’s highlights such as When We’re Dancing. There are moments of sheer beauty here, and Taylor’s vocals feel particularly well suited to the record’s muted shades. She Found A Way Out opens gently with shivering vocals and subdued guitar work that strengthens as it advances before an array of synths dazzle to a chilling conclusion. It’s a rare, lavish moment on a record that prefers to move at its own pace and nestle safely in a comfortable niche. It’s tempting to consider these songs as templates or demos for something much larger, for Dreams is truly the sound of an artist at work in the studio, biding his time and mulling over the subtlest of textures.The majority of Dreams remains elusive and it’s hard to pinpoint what it is that makes virtually every song here such a comforting experience to hear over and over. Answer builds around disparate percussion elements and breathy vocals to create a rhythmic frame that displays Taylor’s ability to shift mood and tempo many times over the course of a single song without revealing the slightest bit of pretense, which is a skill all on its own. Dreams is balances its approach perfectly, tempering its faster moments by those of acoustic calm. BANG couldn’t be any further than its title suggests with its gentle acoustic pickings, (brokencollar) is a beautiful piano instrumental and Rises Silent blossoms into a lofty arrangement complete with chilling vocals in its final minute.Dreams is definitely not for the uninitiated and Taylor has chosen wisely to distance himself from Grizzly Bear with this collection of more avant-garde, new wave offerings. It never goes out of its way to appease to the largest audience it possibly can and occassionally suffers from feeling a little unwelcoming at times, yet there is comfort to be found in its conscientious layers of sound. One might even associate feelings of solace with its patient nature. With Grizzly Bear’s new record only a week away, it’s reassuring to know that Dreams stands in a completely different world. Given the fact that it slipped by most ears first time around and has largely been forgotten about after one year makes it all the more worth revisiting.

CANT
DREAMS COME TRUE

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: SEPTEMBER 12TH 2011


Grizzly Bear is made up of four very talented individuals and together they make a convincing case for one of the greatest bands around today, yet there’s one member that has always stood above the others when it comes to distinction. Chris Taylor has served as producer on both Yellow House and Veckatimest, displaying his talents for production as well as being a multi-instrumentalist. Yet he’s also worked with a multitude of artists, from TV On The Radio to Dirty Projectors and Twin Shadow to The Morning Benders. That’s before mentioning his work with Department Of Eagles and the founding of his own record label (Terrible Records) in 2009. All of this points to Dreams Come True, the first solo release from Taylor under the CANT moniker. His work with Grizzly Bear is carved out by ambitious soundscapes and epic instrumentation that feels continually labored over, yet Dreams Come True explores a different path. Dabbling with electronica and a variety of percussion instruments, Taylor encourages a delicate, fragile atmosphere that really takes a lot of work to crack.


Initial listens can prove daunting or even uninteresting depending on your willingness to persevere, yet there’s a wealth of knowledge and talent beneath Dreams' smoldering surface that's worth exploring. Opening track Too Late, Too Far moves in circles with an infectious rhythm section complete with hand-claps and tribal beats, complemented by a shifting vocal line that proves to be the only melody here that remains in the mind after an initial run through. There’s a similar effect at work on Believe with its bass guitar and glittering synth lines, recalling classic Prince and, strangely enough, Kate Bush’s And So Is Love. One would be right in thinking that Taylor’s work as producer on Twin Shadow’s brilliant record Forget from roughly a year before this release has spilled over to his own solo effort. That’s no bad thing and songs like Believe seem to serve as darker, more sinister brother companions to that record’s highlights such as When We’re Dancing. There are moments of sheer beauty here, and Taylor’s vocals feel particularly well suited to the record’s muted shades. She Found A Way Out opens gently with shivering vocals and subdued guitar work that strengthens as it advances before an array of synths dazzle to a chilling conclusion. It’s a rare, lavish moment on a record that prefers to move at its own pace and nestle safely in a comfortable niche. It’s tempting to consider these songs as templates or demos for something much larger, for Dreams is truly the sound of an artist at work in the studio, biding his time and mulling over the subtlest of textures.


The majority of Dreams remains elusive and it’s hard to pinpoint what it is that makes virtually every song here such a comforting experience to hear over and over. Answer builds around disparate percussion elements and breathy vocals to create a rhythmic frame that displays Taylor’s ability to shift mood and tempo many times over the course of a single song without revealing the slightest bit of pretense, which is a skill all on its own. Dreams is balances its approach perfectly, tempering its faster moments by those of acoustic calm. BANG couldn’t be any further than its title suggests with its gentle acoustic pickings, (brokencollar) is a beautiful piano instrumental and Rises Silent blossoms into a lofty arrangement complete with chilling vocals in its final minute.


Dreams is definitely not for the uninitiated and Taylor has chosen wisely to distance himself from Grizzly Bear with this collection of more avant-garde, new wave offerings. It never goes out of its way to appease to the largest audience it possibly can and occassionally suffers from feeling a little unwelcoming at times, yet there is comfort to be found in its conscientious layers of sound. One might even associate feelings of solace with its patient nature. With Grizzly Bear’s new record only a week away, it’s reassuring to know that Dreams stands in a completely different world. Given the fact that it slipped by most ears first time around and has largely been forgotten about after one year makes it all the more worth revisiting.

About:

1YRON aims to shine the spotlight on albums exactly one year after their release. Presented as an alternative to writing about them instantaneously, I hope to recall the album in question with a fondness of time having passed. Perhaps you may even be inspired to go back and discover something new.

Since physical and digital release dates often vary worldwide (the US commonly a day after the UK for example, or for smaller releases, sometimes weeks or months apart), these reviews will only be published on their UK or US physical release date (whichever comes first).

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